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killingdenouement:

i’m curious what people associate this material with. seems to be a camping thing in the US; for me I can’t help but see rows and rows of roofs, especially mumbai

For me trailers… often used to cover loose loads. They are also cheap and fall apart easily. I remember a particular time I was pulling a trailer and the wind shredded the weave of the tarp and created all this blue dust.
Also, the wood pile at my house as a kid. My dad used old blue tarps like this to cover the wood during the winter, to keep rain and snow out of it. A family of mice made a home in the folded over edge of the tarp, shredding the plastic (not unlike the wind) to make a nest.

killingdenouement:

i’m curious what people associate this material with. seems to be a camping thing in the US; for me I can’t help but see rows and rows of roofs, especially mumbai

For me trailers… often used to cover loose loads. They are also cheap and fall apart easily. I remember a particular time I was pulling a trailer and the wind shredded the weave of the tarp and created all this blue dust.

Also, the wood pile at my house as a kid. My dad used old blue tarps like this to cover the wood during the winter, to keep rain and snow out of it. A family of mice made a home in the folded over edge of the tarp, shredding the plastic (not unlike the wind) to make a nest.

(Source: )

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Yannow references a history of persecution within the space of a city. Thomas Bugeaud, Baron Haussmann, Robert Moses, The Battle of Algiers, Foucault, and La Haine all lend their structure to the city she is sketching. Of course, they are not deeply examined—this is not that kind of book, and not that kind of space it is portraying. The squares of these pages are heavy in repetition, small sketches of stairways, of city blocks, of people in a crowd played over and over again. The same streets, the arrests, the criticism and theory that attempts to understand are also repeated, in reality and in our memories. This is the futility we come to understand through the book. The knowledge that despite all that one has seen, read, done, or made, the cycle will continue. Nothing is really changed. One feels like a set of mere marks, scribbles upon a page, surrounded by blank paper with no sign of what to do next. One turns the page, picks up another book or joins another march, but eventually returns to the desk, in the classroom or the office.

But the blank page is the foundation of architecture. In that space the potential for ideas is found, for designs upon the world that we could make, even if we don’t currently have the means to do so. I couldn’t help but think of the architect Yona Friedman while reading War of Streets and Houses. The architect is famous for his quick sketches, little manifestos of pen and paper to present a concept. They are the most basic of drawings, a comic book that “anyone could draw,” or so it feels. Through these sketches Friedman introduces the largest of ideas, taking on the way we might better use urban spaces, improve human communication, and refine our ideas of what utopia means. Each of Friedman’s stick figures in its own drawn box is a performance, a lecture, a prototype, or a protest. One wonders about the efficacy of portraying a human as a series of quick lines—two arms, two legs, a torso and a head. In one sense, it is alienating, imprecise. Every person looks the same. But in another it is a soft focus, a dream scene. The details are not yet filled in yet, because the sketch is not the building. It is up to us to make it real, to color in the warts and all.

The Drawing of the War on Streets and Houses

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dream home

dream home

(Source: dsgnprctc, via worsethandetroit)

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florals are in

florals are in

(Source: leftside1312)

catvincent:

Ostrich Wave

first try was paincore

second was database goth

(Source: nanobotswarm)

(Source: sucukundbratwurst, via seapuke)

digging in the back of the freezer for the other pack of dumplings you know is in there and then like

digging in the back of the freezer for the other pack of dumplings you know is in there and then like

(Source: bushidocaps, via otakugangsta)

The eradication of distance

The eradication of distance

asylum-art:

Everyday Objects With Faces Are Awesome

When you walk around and look at everything around you, chances are, you may see a face. It may be human, it may be an animal, but sometimes you can see faces in inanimate objects. This is called Pareidolia: Seeing faces in random things!

a friend in college would go around the dorms drawing the missing face components on junction boxes, card readers, fire extinguishers, anything. It made me happy. Say what you want about anthropomorphization, but a world in which junction boxes are excited to be who they are makes me a little more happy myself.

(via wolvensnothere)

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